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A male worker in protective plastic clothing stands in a hallway within the protected area of a nuclear station.

Nuclear safety and emergency preparedness

At Ontario Power Generation, we believe there is no such thing as being too prepared.

See how we build safety into every step of our energy production and learn about the comprehensive emergency preparedness plans for Ontarians.

Strictest safety standards

Our stations operate inside the strictest of standards and regulatory requirements to ensure our communities are always safe.

OPG is responsible for developing and maintaining Emergency Plans that would be used in the very unlikely event of a nuclear emergency.

We ensure responses to any given number of emergency scenarios are tested on a regular basis.

And we plan for the future by responsibly and effectively managing the energy needs and safety concerns of Ontarians.

OPG is a prudent partner in Ontario’s safe energy production, which is why emergency preparedness is part of every facility’s plan.

What you can expect

In the unlikely event of a nuclear accident, radiation may be released in the form of a vapour cloud.

OPG would then notify local and provincial governments within fifteen minutes, and provincial/regional officials would then notify the public of next-steps in any impacted areas through sirens, automated phone calls and widespread announcements via the National Public Alerting system, radio, TV, social media and the web.

If an emergency occurs

Stay calm and don’t evacuate unless advised to do so, and then:

1

Go

Head inside and turn on the TV or radio for instructions

2

Listen

Follow media reports to stay informed of the situation

3

Follow

Instructions from the Province will tell you what to do next

Everyone has a role to play

See how nuclear safety includes our partners, communities and regulatory bodies working together.

Emergency Management Ontario, is responsible for public safety during nuclear emergencies.

This agency administers the Provincial Nuclear Emergency Response Plan and has overall responsibility for managing the off-site response to nuclear emergencies. If a nuclear emergency were to take place, the provincial government would determine the appropriate level of public action.


Through the Durham Emergency Management Office, local municipalities have emergency plans in place to implement the provincial plan.

Importantly, it is their emergency responders, police, fire and ambulance crews who make sure the emergency plans are implemented properly.

Residents near nuclear facilities are responsible for being informed, and knowing what to do in the unlikely event of an emergency.

If an emergency occurs, the province alerts people through a combination of sirens, automated telephone messages and radio, television and social media alerts in the area.

Potassium iodide (KI) pills are a key component to keeping you and your family safe in the unlikely event of an accident.

All homes and businesses within 10 km of nuclear facilities are encouraged to have KI pills on hand. Anyone within 50 km of nuclear facilities is welcome to order KI pills for delivery.

In addition, OPG and our partners assembled an Emergency Awareness Kit containing an updated nuclear safety brochure, a pen light and an emergency checklist magnet. All are contained in a durable folio box, which has room to conveniently store your KI pills.

In 2017, these Emergency Awareness Kits were mailed out to all residents and businesses within a 10 km radius of both the Pickering and Darlington nuclear generating stations.

If you did not receive your kit, please contact:

Lorraine McGratten
416-592-5439