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Construction of new Calabogie hydro station progressing in eastern Ontario

In eastern Ontario, OPG’s redeveloped Calabogie Generating Station (GS) is quickly taking shape.

When it goes into service in 2022, the new two-unit hydroelectric station will provide approximately 11 megawatts of power for the province by efficiently using the water currently available on the Madawaska River. That’s enough electricity to power about 10,000 homes.

An aerial view of the new Calabogie Generating Station powerhouse under construction, and future home to two horizontal Kaplan turbines that will produce approximately 11 megawatts of clean, renewable power for Ontario.
An aerial view of the new Calabogie Generating Station powerhouse under construction, and future home to two horizontal Kaplan turbines that will produce approximately 11 megawatts of clean, renewable power for Ontario.

“We are making steady progress every day on this important clean energy project,” said Tony Palma, Project Manager at OPG. “The redeveloped Calabogie GS station will soon provide more clean, renewable power for Ontario to help us achieve our climate change goals.”

The original, century-old Calabogie GS powerhouse is being replaced with a new, higher capacity powerhouse positioned about 50 metres upstream.

This summer, construction crews made progress on important concrete work to set the foundation for key equipment in the new powerhouse.

In June, the largest single concrete pour of approximately 760 cubic metres was completed during a non-stop 13-hour period to construct the lower half draft tube sections for both generating units.

And in July, an estimated 742 cubic metres of concrete was poured to complete the upper half of the draft tube sections.

The draft tubes are the conduits that return water to the Madawaska River once it has passed through the units.

The two new operating units are capable of handling much more water than the former units, with capacity increasing to 160 cubic meters per second (cms) from 66 cms. This means less water is spilled through the sluices and more water passes through the turbine generators.

OPG is investing more than $100 million to redevelop the Calabogie site, and about 175 person-years of work will be associated with the construction, boosting employment and economic benefits in the region. Through a Joint Venture, SNC Lavalin is responsible for the new station’s design while M. Sullivan & Son is leading construction.

In addition to the Calabogie project, OPG continues to invest in its hydroelectric fleet through refurbishments, overhauls, and repairs to help meet the company’s ambitious net-zero goals. This includes a $2.5-billion turbine/generator overhaul program currently underway at OPG hydro facilities across the province.