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Smoky Falls Generating Station

Smoky Falls Generating Station

RT @ONWaterpower: One of the latest stations to join the #WaterpowerCenturyClub, Unit 2 at Merrickville GS came online in 1919 and has reli…

Tue Feb 19 18:25:45

@Rohit_Scott Hi Rohit, we generate approximately 50% of the electricity used in Ontario, but we aren’t responsible… https://t.co/2Czd0vJPWa

Tue Feb 19 18:14:54

@TheCatBates @imdebating Hi Cat, thanks for your interest! We will have our March Break programs this year. The det… https://t.co/kfmNUljS2q

Tue Feb 19 17:53:40

Smoky Falls Generating Station

PLANT GROUP: Northeast Plant Group
DRAINAGE BASIN: Hudson/James Bay
RIVER: Mattagami
NEAREST POPULATION CENTRE: Kapuskasing (70 km south)
IN SERVICE DATE:
UNITS 1-3 (original, now replaced) - 1931
UNIT 1 (new) - September 2014
UNIT 2 (new) - October 2014
UNIT 3 (new) - November 2014
ACQUIRED BY HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO: 1991
FROM: Spruce Falls Power and Paper
ASSET TRANSFERRED TO ONTARIO POWER GENERATION: April 1, 1999
NUMBER OF UNITS: 4
CAPACITY:  267 MW

As part of the Lower Mattagami Project, in partnership with the Moose Cree First Nation, the original Smoky Falls GS was replaced with a 255 MW, three-unit station at the same site.

The new Smoky Falls GS is LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver Certified. LEED is an internationally recognized system for evaluating environmentally sensitive building design and construction practices. Buildings that are awarded LEED certification incorporate leading-edge design, construction and operational practices that protect the environment and promote healthy working conditions.

OPG's commitment to sustainable development and social responsibility is reflected in efforts to minimize the environmental footprint of buildings and operations, while safely producing power for Ontarians.

Some of the LEED initiatives at the new Smoky Falls GS include:

  • Vegetated open space;
  • Use of recycled materials during construction;
  • Use of wood certified by the Forest Stewardship Council;
  • A reflective roof to reduce the amount of heat absorbed by the building;
  • A reduced amount of water used with low flow fixtures;
  • Reduced use of refrigerants to minimize emissions that contribute to ozone depletion and climate change; and
  • A green cleaning program to enhance the health of building occupants and the environment.