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Eugenia Generating Station

Eugenia Generating Station

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Eugenia Generating Station

DRAINAGE BASIN: Lake Huron
RIVER: Beaver
NEAREST POPULATION CENTRE: Meaford (16.1 km north)
IN SERVICE DATE:
UNITS 1-2 - Nov. 15, 1915
UNIT 3 - March 1, 1920
ACQUIRED BY HYDRO-ELECTRIC POWER COMMISSION OF ONTARIO: 1914
ASSET TRANSFERRED TO ONTARIO POWER GENERATION: April 1, 1999
NUMBER OF UNITS: 3
CAPACITY:  6 MW

100 years and counting

Just the second plant to be built under the newly formed Hydro Electric Commission of Ontario, in 2015 Eugenia Generating Station (GS) celebrated its 100th year of providing clean, renewable electricity to the Province.

Opened by Sir Adam Beck, the Commission’s first chairman, on Nov. 15, 1915, Eugenia filled a need for electricity in the region, providing power to busy concrete factories in Owen Sound, shipyards on Georgian Bay and dozens of newly formed small towns in the region.

The first settlers in the area began clearing land around 1850 but it wasn't until 1890 that local businessman William Hogg built his own 70 kilowatt power station on the Beaver River. After the turn of the century, power rights to the site were purchased by a small syndicate called Georgian Bay Power Company but power development plans were stalled after a site inspection by Hugh Cooper, a chief engineer from the Niagara hydro projects, assessed that a new power station would generate only 500 kilowatts (kW) at best.

But engineers from the Commission made a different determination. Although the river was small, they saw that the substantial head (vertical drop) could be harnessed to generate more than 4500 kW, so the Commission purchased the power rights to the site and construction of Eugenia GS began in 1915 with first unit going into service later that year.

As with the operations at all of our generating stations, OPG is considerate of the environment and other users of the waterways. Our technicians manage water levels and flows according to approved water management plans. The amount of water available for generation depends on environmental needs, minimum and maximum water level requirements, and precipitation.

Eugenia GS generates clean, renewable electricity 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and is part of OPG’s clean energy portfolio which is more than 99 per cent free of greenhouse gas and smog emissions.